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Itís Your Ship - A Book Summary

This article is based on the following book:
Itís Your Ship
"Management Techniques from the Best Damn Ship in the Navy"
By Captain D. Michael Abrashoff
Published by Warner Books, 2002
ISBN 0-446-52911-7
224 pages

A challenge for every organization is to attract, retain
and motivate employees. If a company succeeds in doing
so, employees work with more passion, energy, and enthusiasm. This translates to an increase in
productivity and more profit for the company.

Another factor to remember is this: real leadership
must be done by example. Remember that the people below
you follow your lead and that you have an enormous
influence on your employees. They will look up to you
for signals on how to behave and what the organization
expects from them.

Remember that one of the secrets to a successful
management of any organization is to be able to
articulate a common goal that inspires people to work
hard together. Proper, effective and open communication
of goals, rules, instructions and expectations can
spell a difference.

The best way for an organization to succeed is to give
the employees all the responsibility they can handle
and then stand back. Trusting your employees to do
their job well sustains the company.

Trust is also a social contract Ė you have to earn it.
Trust is earned when you give it. When people start
trusting each other more and more, they stop
questioning motives and start to work as one unit.

Encourage the people in your organization to be more result-oriented by opening their minds to new ideas. Encourage them to use their imagination to find new
ways of doing things. Your employees must learn how
to take the initiative.

It is also important to remember that sometimes, you
need to learn to take calculated risks. Bet on people
who think for themselves. By taking a "leap of faith"
and trusting that one person can do the job and do it
right, you increase his self-confidence and make him
do his job even better. You must also learn to take a
chance on a promising sailor. Give people second
chances especially if you see potential in him. He
might just surprise you with outstanding results.
Lastly, if a rule doesnít make sense, break it
carefully. Remember, there is always room for
improvement but think ideas thoroughly before
implementing it.

In any business, standard operating procedure (SOP)
is the rule. It is safe, proven and effective. However,
SOP seldom gets outstanding results and distracts
people from what is really important.

Innovation and progress are realized when you go
beyond standard operating procedures. Sometimes, you
have to look for new ways to handle old tasks and find
new approaches to new problems.

Good leaders strengthen their organization by building
their people and helping them feel good about
themselves and their jobs. When this happens, morale
and productivity is improved which translates to
increased profit for the company. Focus on building self-esteem. Show them that you trust and believe
in them. Praise them for a job well done.

Unity is essential to any organization. If you donít
support each other, the organization will soon
encounter critical problems that may be irreparable.
The job of a leader is to assemble the best team
possible, train the unit, and figure out the best way
to get the members to work together for the good of
the organization.

Lastly, remember that people who enjoy and look
forward to going to work are more productive and
happy. You can create a positive atmosphere at work
by letting people have fun and interact with their
colleagues. Having fun at work creates more social
glue for the organization. This results in productivity
and loyalty.




About the Author:

Captain D. Michael Abrashoff is a Former Commanding
Officer of the United States Navy. He is also founder
and CEO of GrassRoots Leadership, Inc. Immediately
after leaving the Navy, Mike created GrassRoots
Leadership, advising others on how to empower their
people while increasing profits and cutting costs.
Mike continues to spread his message through his
first book, "Itís Your Ship", published by Warner Books.


By: Regine P. Azurin
Regine Azurin is the President of BusinessSummaries.com,
a company that provides business book summaries of the
latest bestsellers for busy executives and entrepreneurs.

http://www.bizsum.com/freearticle.htm
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This article was submitted by - Meg Cardigan Please Rate/Review this Article - Recommend it to friends

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